Guest Professorial Lecture and Materclass with Noenoe Silva

The Global Indigeneity and Reconciliation Program and the Global Cities Research Institute is honoured to host two upcoming events with noted Hawaiian scholar Noenoe Silva – a Public Lecture on Thursday, 26 September 2013 (6.00 – 7.30 pm) and a Global Indigeneity Masterclass on Friday, 27 September 2013 (10 am – 12 noon).  To reserve your place simply email sam.carroll-bell@rmit.edu.au by 5pm, Wednesday, 25 September 2013.

 

Professor Noenoe Silva

Professor Silva was born on O‘ahu (Hawai’i) of Kanaka Maoli descent and teaches courses in indigenous politics at the University of Hawai‘i. Her first book, Aloha Betrayed: Native Hawaiian Resistance to American Colonialism (Duke University Press, 2004), received the “Most Influential Book in Native American and Indigenous Studies in the First Decade of the Twenty-First Century Prize” at the Annual meeting of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association in Sacramento in 2011.

Aloha Betrayed is a ground-breaking critique of Hawai’i’s colonial history and has been described by scholar J. Kehaulani Kauanui as “a superb contribution to the ongoing process of decolonization, recovery, and overcoming the suppression of Kanaka Maoli knowledge.” Professor Silva is currently working on her second book which focuses on Hawaiian intellectual history.

 

Public Lecture – Towards Kanaka Intellectual History

Drawing on the literary biographies of two important albeit relatively unknown authors, this lecture sketches the long intellectual history and traditions of the Hawaiian Kanaka. The first author to be profiled, Joseph Hoʻonaʻauao Kānepuʻu, was a schoolteacher from Kalaupapa, Molokai, who lived his adult life on Oʻahu and contributed to a wide variety of writing to the Hawaiian-language newspapers. He was a strong advocate for the newspapers, the native language, and native ontologies and epistemologies.  He published between about 1856 and about 1883. The second author, Joseph Mokuʻōhai Poepoe was an attorney, writer, editor, and politician from Kohala, Hawaiʻi, who also lived his adult life in the capital of Honolulu.  He published, starting with translations of European tales, from about 1870 to about 1910. Both were committed to the vitality of our native language, literature, and people. They are but two of hundreds of intellectuals who wrote in Hawaiian in newspapers between 1834 and 1948.

Lecture Details
Thursday, 26 September 2013
6.00 – 7.30 pm

RMIT City Campus
Emily McPherson Building (13)
Multi-purpose Room, Level 3, Room 7
Cnr of Russell and Victoria Streets
Melbourne  Vic  3000

RSVP to sam.carroll-bell@rmit.edu.au by 5pm, Wednesday, 25 September 2012.

 

Global Indigeneity Masterclass

This Global Indigeneity Masterclass is open to all Honours, Masters and PhD students, and Early Career Researchers across RMIT. It will focus on Professor Noenoe Silva’s areas of expertise including indigenous languages and concepts, indigenous expressions of culture, pre and post-colonial political histories, and contemporary indigenous politics in Hawai‘i and Oceania.

Lecture Details
Friday, 27 September 2013
10.00 am – 12 noon

RMIT City Campus
Emily McPherson Building (13)
Level 1, Room 2
Cnr of Russell and Victoria Streets
Melbourne  Vic  3000

RSVP sam.carroll-bell@rmit.edu.au by 5pm, Wednesday, 25 September 2013.

 

More

Click on this link for more information on the Global Indigeneity and Reconciliation Program.

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