Migration and diasporic communities
Summary

The project has addressed three research questions at different stages of the study.

The first part focused on the settled Indian community, that is professional migrants and their families who arrived in Australia between the 1970s and the 1980s. The issue at the centre was how sending money home was a way of expressing caring for the transnational family back in the country of origin.

The second part of the study focused on second generation Indian Australians. They were either born in Australia or had migrated with their parents before they were 12 years old. The issue at the centre was that of identity.

The third part dealt with Indian international students who had come since 2005. Unlike the settled Indian community, they and their families were paying for the possibility of migrating. Education had been consciously linked in policy to gaining permanent residency. It signalled a change in the flows of money, in that money first came from India with the possibility that after settlement it would go from Australia to India. This group wanted the option for settlement, but they were young and single, and so had a greater potential for mobility and return.

Start By 1 April 2005
Completed By 31 December 2012
Funding RMIT Research Support
Funded by the Community Sustainability Program and the College of Business, RMIT.





Outcomes Publications related to Migration and Diasporic Communities:

Edited Book

Babacan, A & Singh, S 2010, Migration, belonging and the nation state, Newcastle upon Tyne, Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

Chapters

Singh, S & Cabraal, A (Forthcoming) ‘Boomerang remittances’ and circular care among Indian transnational families in Australia, In Loretta Baldassar and Laura Merla (eds) Transnational families, migration and kin-work: from care chains to care circulation, Routledge.

Singh, S 2009, 'Mobile remittances: design for financial inclusion' in N. Aykin (ed.) Internationalization, Design and Global Development: Third International Conference, IDGD 2009, held as part of the International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2009, Springer, New York, United States, pp. 515-524.

Singh, S 2007, 'Sending money home: money and family in the Indian diaspora' in Ajaya Kumar Sahoo, Brij Maharaj (ed.) Sociology of Diaspora - A Reader (Vol 2), Rawat Publications, New Delhi, pp. 975-998.

Peer reviewed papers

Singh, S, Cabraal, A & Robertson, S. (Forthcoming 2012), 'Transnational family money:
Remittances, gifts and inheritance', in Journal of Intercultural Studies, Routledge.

Singh, S & Cabraal, A (Forthcoming, 2012), ‘Remittances as a currency of care: contested representations of money and the idea of family’, South Asia.

Singh, S & Bhandari, M 2012, 'Money management and control in the Indian joint family across generations' in The Sociological Review, vol. 60, no. 1, pp. 46-67.

Singh, S 2011, 'Indian students in Melbourne: Challenges to multiculturalism', in Journal of Intercultural Studies, vol. 32, no. 6, pp. 673-689.

Singh, S, Robertson, S & Cabraal, A 2010, 'Remittances as a currency of care: a focus on “Twice Migrants” among the Indian Diaspora in Australia', in Journal of Comparative Family Studies, vol. XXXXI (2), pp. 245-263.

Singh, S & Cabraal, A 2010, 'Indian Students and Community Sustainability', in People and Place, vol. 18, pp. 19-30.

Singh, S 2007, 'Sending money home - maintaining family and community', in International Journal of Asia Pacific Studies (IJAPS), vol. 3 (2), pp. 93-109.

Refereed Conference papers

Singh, S 2008, 'The social and cultural interpretation of number: a focus on remittances as a currency of care', in T. Marjoribanks et al (ed.) Conference Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Australian Sociological Association - Reimagining Society, Melbourne, Australia, 2-5 December 2008.

Singh, S 2006, 'Towards a sociology of money and family in the Indian diaspora', in Contributions to Indian Sociology, vol. 40, no. 3, pp. 375-398.

International Presentations

Singh, S 2007, Sending money home: the tensions of transnational money, Presentation at the Department of Sociology, Delhi School of Economics, 23 November 2007.

Singh, S 2005, Sending money home: money and family in the Indian diaspora, Paper presented at the Institute for International Integration Studies, Trinity College, Dublin, 13 April 2005.

Singh, S 2005, Designing for money across borders, Paper presented at the Human Computer Interaction International Conference, Las Vegas, July 2005.




Researcher(s) Anuja Cabraal, Supriya Singh
Program Community, Migration and Development
Location(s) Melbourne – Australia